Recap of our games in 2017

Last year was satisfyingly productive for our studio. New clients with technical challenges helped us finish the year with a more complete and rich portfolio. Here’s a quick recap.

HTML5 Licensable games

Part of our activity as studio consists on developing HTML5 games to be licensed to game portals, or game apps. The 3 licensable titles developed this year include a chess game and 2 puzzle games.

These titles were developed keeping in mind the youngest audiences. Nevertheless when they shine the most is when played together by kids and their parents. Each of these games can be a good tool to teach stuff about animals, chess and logical puzzles.

 

 

This area of business is something we definitely want to improve in the current year, so expect lots of new licensable games for all audiences!

Electronic gambling (slots)

Back in 2014 we published Pocahontas Slots, a just for fun slots machine with no actual transactions. Having this prior experience in gambling games got us a new commission in 2017. In this new project we were introduced to safe server communications and the Provably Fair system. The gambling world is truly a whole dimension of new tips and tricks.

 

Legend of Mjolnir - HTML5 slots

 

Game development for major gaming portals

Once again we had the chance of collaborating with two major companies in the field of online games. Both of the developed games were starred by female yet radically different characters. On one side, our fourth game for Spil Games was a cooking game featuring Barbara, a gentle and hardworking baker. On the other side, a kinky clicker game developed for Minijuegos where you play the role of a Youtuber’s psycho fan.

 

 

We are always eager to collaborate with companies to help them developing games. Not only gaming portals but also helping companies from different fields to produce great advergames.

 

Multiplayer games for Directi

In 2017 the Indian based IT company Directi launched their game platform called Kapow. Since they chose HTML5 as main technology for their platform, Ravalmatic was the right match for this venture.

We had the chance of producing 3 multiplayer games for them during this year. These set of games were our first contact with a turn-based multiplayer design. After dozens of games where we just cared about the client side, working on the server side too was a rich experience for all of us as a team. This is a path we will love to walk by again in 2018.

 

 

We are confident that this current year will increase our portfolio with new challenging projects. It’s just January, but have finished already a couple of games, and are working on 5 more projects. Looks like next year’s recap will be an even longer post!

 

Porting games to HTML5

Do you have an old and successful game that you’d like to port to HML5? Let’s talk!

Our studio has already worked developing exclusive games for many clients from the game industry, like Miniclip or Spil Games, but also from other ambits, like Adesso, a talent recruiting agency. While we enjoy developing original concepts, there are times when clients already have a great game, but it was originally coded for a specific environment. What we offer is to port these successful games to HTML5. Games that were downloadable for PC, or just playable from smartphones, now can be adapted to HTML5, with all of its advantages.

The main advantage of having a game ported to HTML5 is its ubiquity. The games can be played on all kinds of devices directly from a browser. It doesn’t matter if it’s a desktop, a mobile device or a smart TV. If you decide to have it in Google Play or the App Store too we can wrap it so that you can publish it there.

In most cases your game will just need to be re-coded in JavaScript. Than means less costs versus developing a brand new game. Basically because you can recycle existing art and a pre-stablished gameplay. Occasionally some changes may be required in the controls to support touch screens.

Here an example of a game we’ve ported:

Hotel Solitaire is owned by GameHouse. It worked very well for years and that’s why they wanted to squeeze a bit more their IP. Originally it was coded in Java. We used the existing graphic and audio set to produce a game that works well on desktop and mobile devices.

Besides game ports, another way of producing games with a tight budget is re-skinning, but that’s a complete different option we covered on this blog entry.

 

Multiplayer HTML5 games tools

multiplayer html5 games

WebSockets are the most popular technology for developing multiplayer HTML5 games. They allow bidirectional communications between clients and server using a single socket TCP.

We code our multiplayer HTML5 games in Javascript, both the client and the server side. More specifically, we use a game engine called phaser.io for the client and Node.js in the server.

There are several options for working with WebSockets. The most common and simple is Socket.io. We implemented sockets.io on our first projects. However, due to the increasing complexity and demands of our current projects we decided to change to SocketCluster.

Why we love doing HTML5 multiplayer games using SocketCluster

SocketCluster is an open source framework optimized to run with Kubernetes (K8s). It’s the base for our multiplayer development for the following reasons:

  • Because it’s faster and more versatile than socket.io. SocketCluster uses µwebsockets (coded in C++) and offers pub/sub.
  • Highly reliable.
  • Supports custom codecs during transmission to increase data exchange speed.
  • It’s easy to scale. Vertically using multiple cores of the CPU of a single host and horizontally with several servers. It doesn’t require Redis to share the state between processes.

For all of you looking for an introduction to SocketCluster we recommend this complete example of an Agar.io game type:

MultiPlayer game example using Phaser on GitHub.

Finally, here a very useful comparison of the main modules implementing WebSockets:

uWebSockets

ReSkinning: customizable and cheap games

While some of our clients want to produce their own taylor-made games, they’re not always familiar with the actual costs of producing a game from scratch. Depending on the client needs it could be faster and cheaper reSkinning an existing game. Read more

Advergaming case study: Heroes of Java

One of our last published games is a great example of advergaming’s potential. We would like to take this opportunity to speak about our project and introduce a topic we’ll be glad to cover in the future.

Some people might consider this game as a plain example of advergaming. At first sight you could think that Adesso is looking for some visibility in the field of games by publishing this game. But it’s not just that. For Adesso it’s not simply a playable banner but a tool. In fact we may consider we are in front of a Serious Game.

If you haven’t read the entry of Heroes of Java in our portfolio here’s the story behind the game.

advergaming post heroes of java gorilla in the park

Damm! How good is the gorilla playing pinball. But he needs to improve his Java skills though…

Advergaming success case study

First things first: let’s introduce our client. Adesso is a german IT recruiting company. In other words, Adesso helps their clients to find the professional programmers they need.

Newcomer players are introduced to a regular pinball table. They play their first shot as they would normally do. And then an overlay new screen appears with a quiz about Java (the script language, not the island!). With every ball they lose in the game, they are asked a new question. If they answer correctly, they’ll be rewarded with an extra ball, and so, savvier players will be able to play more balls in the long run. As players lose their last ball, they are offered to register their details in exchange of participating in the raffle of a 3D printer.

advergaming post heroes of javaAs the programmer starts thinking about code, the whole world fades away. […] He will probably miss his stop.

Our game then sends the player’s info along with his answers, and they are registered in Adesso’s database. Instead of making the job candidates fill and send an old-fashioned CV, Adesso now has access to a qualitative register. They have tools to judge beforehand the knowledge of the candidates, which means having less filters in the candidate interview process. In the end, it’s all about improving efficiency.

We should make clear that it’s not like Adesso is fishing programmers in the open sea by releasing the game in the general market. The game will be distributed in the proper niche environment, but that’s just a complete different story.

An ideal scenario for HTML5 technology

We’ve mentioned about how Adesso improved their efficiency on the overall recruiting process, but there’s another aspect where efficiency shines. Instead of using a native platform to build the project, the choice of HTML5 allows to run the game on mobile devices but also on computer browsers. Although this is not the case, the game could even be wrapped to be uploaded as a native app in the Appstore or Google Play. So all in all, the choice of HTML5 was the perfect option to build the game and get the maximum ubiquity, with no need of external plug-ins. The game is accessible for a really wide audience and it’s been coded just once. No extra ports, no further development costs.

I hope you found interesting this post. Take care!

Theme and atmosphere in Algerian Solitaire

Today we would like to introduce you to our latest licensable HTML5 game, Algerian Solitaire. This exotic card game takes us to the dreamlike setting of the Sahara desert. It will also help us as an excuse to cover the interesting topic of the theme in solitaire games.

Read more

New Foot Chinko game with new tricks

We are happy to announce we are working on a new Foot Chinko chapter.

 

new-footchinko-eurocup 

It’s been a long time since the original game was launched and we were excited about the possibility of developing a new Foot Chinko game. During this time it seems that our little creature has been growing in popularity. Although the game was released over a year ago, enthusiastic players keep on uploading videos: Foot Chinko on youtube

Is it our imagination or does it look like searches on google for the keyword “foot chinko” are growing? Results on google trends

We are going to release an HTML5 exclusive version of the game for Spil Games. This version will feature the Eurocup 2016 and will include a couple of new mechanics.

We are also considering a native version of the game for iOS, Android and Windows phone using Unity. By combining the old game levels with the new ones, we could have almost 150 different levels, but the truth is, in this time we’ve learned so much about level design that designing a complete new set of levels is an interesting challenge.

So, what kind of publisher do you think would be a good partner for this adventure? We would love to hear your thoughts…

Help phaser development

 phaser_logo

We’ve been using an html5 game engine called Phaser for over a year. It’s open source and was created by a photon storm.Our experiences with Phaser have been fantastic. We’ve tried several frameworks but found Phaser the best game engine to develop our games from the usability and performance points of view.Now Richard Davey, the man behind Phaser, has started a campaign to collect money to be able to dedicate more time enhancing his incredible framework.Please check this out:

>> Phaser on Patreon

RavalMatic defies the USA

RavalMatic has broken the embargo imposed to Russia by the USA and sold its most strategic game to Comon Games, a courageous Russian company.
The negotiations were conducted with maximum secrecy in Viena by one of our agents and high level officials of Comon Games. Once the deal was completed, we inserted an usb memory in a banana. That usb contained all the project files. The banana was part of a bananas cargo that left the harbour of Barcelona 3 weeks ago with direction to Istanbul.
Nobody of the crew was aware that among the thousands of bananas they that transported there was such a dangerous game!
The third of June, two members of the Russian embassy in Istanbul got the banana, carefully extracted the usb key, ate the banana to destroy all evidence and flew to Moscow to deliver the app-files to top executives of Comon Games.